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How Can You Reduce Your 1 in 3 Cancer Risk Part 3, What Do Antioxidants Do by Melissa Stockman

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How can you reduce your 1 in 3 cancer risk? 
Part 3:  What do antioxidants do?
By Melissa Stockman RN, BC-ANP, PNP                                                                                                            Medical Director of TimeToPlay ,                                                                                                                       Board Certified Nurse Practitioner & RN                                                                                            Email: rejuvn8melissa@aol.com
According to the NCI (National Cancer Institute), “At high concentrations, ….free radicals can be hazardous to your body, including the DNA…The damage to cells caused by free radicals…play a role in cancer & other health conditions”.   Diets rich in antioxidants defend against oxidation of LDL (lipids) & plaque formations that clog arteries & cause CAD.   As per Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center “In small clinical trials, reishi (Reishi is derived from specific mushrooms)…enhanced immune responses in cancer patients.  In another study, …reishi…appeared to suppress development of colorectal adenomas.  Remission of hepatocellular carcinoma was reported in a few cases in a single study.  Another case study suggests benefits of gastrointestinal cancer patients….further research is needed.”  “Reishi …stop the growth & prevent the spread of cancer cells in laboratory & animal studies”, says K. Simon Young, manager of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center’s “About Herbs” website.  “The mushrooms can also play a role in cancer prevention, says Daniel Silva, Senior Investigator of Indiana University Health Methodist Hospital’s Cancer Research Laboratory in Indianapolis.  I personally take herbal supplementations derived from mushrooms.      
 Antioxidants interact with & neutralize the free radicals to stop that chain reaction of free radicals damaging more nearby atoms or molecules.  Antioxidants donate an electron (-) to end the stealing of electrons which then ends the chain reaction.  Thus, each antioxidant can prevent many many many many free radicals from forming.  The body makes some antioxidants but not enough to keep up with the demand of free radical chain reactions.   Remember, free radical damage accumulates with age.  I believe that since antioxidants stop & slow down free radical formations & their chain reactions, they promote health, slow down oxidation aka aging, promote weight loss, reduce your risk of cancers & other diseases.  Patients of mine who have raised their antioxidant levels seemed to lose their excess weight quicker too.  When we starve ourselves of calories, our bodies compensates by burning the calories slower to conserve energy.  I believe the same thing happens when we don’t get enough nutrients.   
Learn more about preventing free radical damage by reading future parts of this article, joining our “Reduce your 1 in 3 Cancer Risk” 
*Join Melissa for her monthly “Be Healthy Program” at the Time to Play Office located at 1075 Rte 112 Port Jefferson Station starting on Tuesday, February  21st and every 3rd Tuesday of each month. Call 631-331-2675 for details or email Melissa at  rejuvn8melissa@aol.com  Hope to see you there!
 
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How Can You Reduce Your 1 in 3 Cancer Risk by Melissa Stockman

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Tips to Increase Daily Activity

Yes, we all know that a healthy body is a moving body.  But in today’s high tech and fast moving world sometimes it hard to find the time to get things shakin’. The time is there, its how we use it. According to an article posted on https://www.lihealthcollab.org ” experts at the CDC recommend adults get in at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity. These statistics may seem overwhelming to achieve on a busy schedule, but what if we told you that it was possible to sneak in time throughout your day? What if we also told you increasing your activity from couch potato to walking 10 minutes a day, could help you sleep better and be more productive at work? ”

Well what can we do? Avoid the drive -thru, get out and walk, park far from the door and speed walk your way in, get your friends together for a walk, go that one block further while walking the dog. Stairs are a great boost to get you moving going up and down gets the heart pumping!  How about while watching your favorite show you do some crunches or leg lifts. We have more time to do these thing than we think. So okay people, lets get moving!!  For the full article “11 Easy Tips to Help Increase Your Daily Activity go to http://www.lihealthcollab.org/article.aspx?id=ad98746e-8a02-42a1-883c-d983f5b6658b&title=11+Easy+Tips+to+Help+Increase+Your+Daily+Activity

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DECLINING LIFE EXPECTANCY ACCORDING TO NEW CDC DATA

Excerpt from the article by Dr. David Ludwig published 4/4/2016:

“In 2005, colleagues and I predicted in the New England Journal of Medicine that life-expectancy would decline in the US by mid-century due to the obesity epidemic. But I was stunned to see evidence for this prediction so soon in preliminary data just released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Age-adjusted deaths rates for the first 9 months of 2015 increased significantly compared to the same time period in 2014, most notably involving obesity-related conditions like heart disease, diabetes, stroke and Alzheimer’s.

Although these data are preliminary, the downward trend in longevity will almost certainly accelerate as this generation of children — heavier from earlier in life than ever before — reaches adulthood. It’s one thing for someone to develop obesity at age 45, diabetes at 55, and heart disease at 65. But what if the clock starts ticking at age 10?”

Read the whole article at:  https://medium.com/@davidludwigmd/declining-life-expectancy-according-to-new-cdc-data-d137ae07d1bb#.tablntrdh

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Who is the Patient’s Advocate?

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At a recent meeting of patient safety professionals a small group of nurses huddled around where I was sitting, and one began to share a story about how hard it is to advocate for patients.  She explained that a woman who was in labor was in the hospital and one of the nurse’s colleagues was taking care of her.  As her advocate, the nurse knew what the patient wanted – a normal delivery.  But events moved slowly and as the woman was not yet sufficiently dilated, the resident physician ordered medication to speed up her delivery.  The patient’s nurse knew this is not what the patient wanted; but the nurse “needed” to find the nurse manager who then needed to find the attending who would then go to the resident for authority to countermand the medication order.  By this time the mother was in labor, and as a result of the effort to hurry things along, was showing signs of complications — hemorrhage.

The nurses listening to the story were sympathetic to the mother as well as to the nurse who was there to advocate for the patient.  They expressed frustration about the chain of command they felt they had to follow in order to help this patient. This chain of command, they all agreed, was the problem.

But I disagreed with the nurses.  It was not about the resident giving the wrong order.  I asked the nurse why the patient wasn’t immediately consulted about speeding up delivery.  That’s where the delay was, I told them.  If she were truly advocating for the patient, the nurse would have told the resident, in front of the patient, that this is not what the patient had wanted. The nurse said that it would not have been appropriate to speak in front of the patient.  “Why,” I asked?

This is the culture change that is needed.  The family, I explained to her, would never have followed that procedure.  A loved one with this mother-to-be would have said “Stop: this is how we are going to do it, we will respect her wishes for a natural delivery.”  If this patient’s family member had trained through the PULSE of NY Family Centered Patient Advocacy program, he or she would not have been intimidated or caught off guard. They would know what patient-centered care is — and realize that this was not very patient-centered.

If you feel that your relative who is a patient is not being consulted, you have a right to stop the process and make sure the patient is in charge. This mother-to-be could have said that she didn’t care, they could do what they want; or she could have said, “I don’t want my labor induced – what are the other options?”  At any time the patient can ask a loved one or nurse to be involved, help make decisions… or not.  In this case, the nurses truly believed what they did was patient-centered even though the patient had no control of the situation.

That is where the culture of patient care needs to change.

Sign up for the PULSE of NY Family Centered Patient Advocacy Training – 8 hours of patient safety education and learning advocacy skills and communication.

Tuesday evening May 19 and Thursday May 21 from 5:30 PM – 9:30 PM

3601 Hempstead Tpke. Levittown.  Registration required by April 25, no walk-ins.

Cost: $125.00 per person or come with a team of three people and pay $75.00 each.  That’s a savings of $50.00 per person.  (Each participant must register separately.)  Visit www.pulseofny.org to register